Westward Ho!

Lord_RogueI finally buckled down and did it—edited and prepared LORD ROGUE and CHEYENNE’S LADY for an e-book edition. These books were nearly 150,000 words originally, written back in the day when books were books and men were men. <G> LORD ROGUE holds a place in my heart because it was written about St. Louis and the Mississippi River, an area I lived in off and on for over twenty years. The period of 1812, the year after the Great Comet, was particularly lively with the war with Britain, Indian unrest, a chieftain who could predict the future, the first steamboat down the river, and an earthquake that made the river run backward. And because I had all those lovely words to play in, I used all those incidents! The hero of this book is such a contradiction in so many ways, that I’ve loved him for years. Take a quick look at the first pages and see what you think.

To celebrate my finally finishing these books, I’ve repackaged my other Americana: my Rita nominee, DENIM AND LACE, my sagas SHELTER FROM THE STORM, MOONLIGHT MISTRESS, and WAYWARD ANGEL, plus CHEYENNE’S LADY, my one and only gunfighter story, into a six book series.

If you want to just taste the western waters first, LORD ROGUE will be 99c for this month only.

I’m not entirely certain why historical romance has abandoned our fascinating Moonlight_and_MemoriesAmerican history for England and the Regency era. We had lovely fashions, wealthy mansions, and noble heroes as often or more so than England. But for some reason, we seem to think of that era in our country as prairies and covered wagons. Take a walk on the wild side and see if you don’t develop a taste for a hero who can hold his own in any company!

Judgment Call

Rice_TheoryofMagic800My romances often reflect issues I grapple with personally. But because the books are upbeat and often humorous, the issues aren’t immediately obvious. Sure, my blind marquess in THEORY OF MAGIC has anger issues. He’s disabled in a society that considers disability a matter of shame. His heroine (and quite frequently, his family) point out that as a marquess, he’s fortunate in a society that walks over the poor and helpless, but in 1830, wealthy white privilege is a matter of fact, not social commentary.

Still, I tried to show the very human tendency to judge others on the basis of appearances or hearsay, without any evidence to prove that opinion right or wrong. I’m as guilty as anyone. I scorn books with poorly written blurbs or bad covers, assuming the writing will be equally unprofessional. I am a literary snot. I know this, but it’s an easy way of dismissing the barrage of information crossing my computer screen. Continue reading

Regency City Town Homes

My historical romances tend to be set in rural areas, because it’s so much simpler to push the characters together with limited surroundings–and besides, I love the georgian townhousessprawling estates! Until I actually went to London and visited some of the town houses, I had images of spacious London homes too. Reality isn’t as fun.

The image here is actually Dublin because I couldn’t ferret one out of my files for London that didn’t contain shopping on the bottom floor. But this is what the older sections of London would look like. Mayfair–where most of our Regency character reside in the new houses–might have larger residences, but only for the wealthy.

Now imagine my busy marquess entertaining his political friends, housing his brothers and his sons, and throwing a new wife into the mix. Can we say “crowded”? What’s the smallest house you’ve ever lived in?